Sunday, 10 January 2016

2016 ND&B Northern Wheatear Trophy


Yes, it's that time again...
The UK's premier award that celebrates all things white-arse...

The 2016 North Downs and beyond Northern Wheatear Trophy

Previous holders of the trophy can be seen above, from left to right: 2013 Gavin Haig (Devon); 2014 Martin Casemore (Kent); and the current holder, 2015 Jono Lethbridge (Essex). A new rule is that only bloggers linked to ND&B, or contributors, are eligible for entry. There will be three categories:

Earliest posting
Whoever posts the earliest image of a 2016 UK Northern Wheatear wins this one. Blog posting only.

Numbers champion (the big one!)
Whoever posts the most images of Northern Wheatears between now and the end of April 2016. A photograph of five birds together will count as 5 images! Get snapping!!! No repeat images, and that means you, Peter Alfrey!! Blog posting only.

Best photograph
The best image of a UK Northern Wheatear in 2016 (up until the end of April), to be judged by as yet unannounced members of the BBC's Countryfile team (likely to change) will be the winner. And might be used on the 2017 Countryfile calendar - might. Or as a nifty t-shirt design to be worn by Chris Packham during live transmission of BBCs Springwatch - possibly. And, as the other categories, blog posting only.

So, to recap: Northern Wheatear only. UK only. 2016 only.

11 comments:

  1. I'm going to head out to Cotham Paddocks and try and sneak this one in March!

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  2. Gutted - if I hadn't caught that eel tonight I had a Wheatear photo poised, ready to accompany an offering about looking forward to another year of much the sameness! Sums up my life at present - a story of what might have been! Oh woe is me.

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    1. Has to be a Northern Wheatear, taken in 2016 in the UK, Dyl. Rules are rules!!

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    2. Goal posts and moving spring to mind - such is life?

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  3. I'll check Jarmans tomorrow, with all this mild weather.....

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    1. I'd expect nothing less of you Martin!

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  4. Where has this Northern Wheatear name suddenly come from, most people that I know, myself included, call Wheatears just that, or have we suddenly got a new species visiting that I've been unaware of.

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    1. Times move on Derek, but you are at liberty to remain where you feel comfortable. I often stay behind when it suits me.

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  5. What times are they then Steve, what is the reasoning behind the new name, is there now a Southern Wheatear, are we to have Northern Swallow, Northern House Martin, etc,etc. I'm struggling with the point of it.

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  6. Forget my last comment, I see that Birdguides refer to it as Northern Wheatear but the RSPB just Wheatear, clearly the RSPB are as behind with the birding times as I am.

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