Saturday, 26 January 2013

Stirring under the snow


Colley Hill this morning, looking westwards towards where I would have been standing when I took the photograph shown in the previous post. Don't be fooled into thinking that there must be Mountain Hares, Ptarmigans and rare saxifrages nearby, because this is only at the heady height of 220m. Granted, a virtual mountain range for an East Anglian, but a poor excuse for upland to our more northern friends.

It was quiet. Three individual Skylarks moving east was just about it as far as viz mig went, and the only surprise was flushing four Red-legged Partridges on the southern scarp. Most gratifying was the melting snow revealing the leaves of thousands of violets, plus some flowering Dog's Mercury. There was even enough warmth in the sun to unleash a few hardy flies.

5 comments:

  1. We got about 5in of snow ovvernight. Thankfully it`s supposed to be last lot for the time being. Bring on next week`s rise in temperature.

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  2. Ah, but with the snow Dean, you got Waxwings!

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  3. I love it also for the herbs up there Steve (I think it's wild Thyme and Oregano). I've thought the same as you about being a migration spot. Looking up at that direction from my garden I often see large parties of Gulls appearing to navigate along the ridge (preumably before they cut up towards the London reservoirs) and hirundines in Spring and Autumn. Still to get a Red Kite lumbering over there though - must be soon now, probably need to open my eyes more often!.

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  4. Lucky you. All our snow has gone now and I miss it.

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  5. Jerry - the plant life up there is considerable. Man Orchids as well! I, too, have yet to nail a Red Kite on the hill.

    Andrew - I'm not a great snow lover to be honest.

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