Saturday, 25 November 2017

Of computers and Lapwings

We still haven't replaced our computer. The truth is, we are not really missing it. Phones and tablets do most of the donkey-work and the only times that I could do with the computer is when I wish to manipulate images or write a chunk of copy - these are doable on the smaller platforms but not as easy to do so. There is also the question of storing files - I know that stuff can be stored in the 'cloud' but I still like to see files on a desktop that I can move around and store in places of my choice.

One side-effect of all this is that my blogging has lessened in frequency (some of you might think that's a good thing!) I'm sure that we will get our act together and buy one soon. I can then bore you with pictures of moss, moths, dead leaves, fungi and maybe a Hawfinch or two...

Speaking of Big Bills, I had one flying over Canons Farm at 08.00hrs this morning, heading south. This was followed by a Lapwing that flew out of Horse Pasture before drifting off west. Lapwing is a good bird for here. It was only 12 years ago that the site held a wintering flock of 70+ birds. Little did I know then that such a sight was destined to be nothing but a faded memory on the farm.

5 comments:

John said...

Come on Steve, your last sentence! It has been obvious for years that as habitat, Canon's farm has deteriorated drastically almost to the point of being a desert. The change in management of it (and most other arable farms in the south-east)has meant the flora has been denuded hence reduction in invertebrate number and diversity and loss of bird species. Even the pigeons appear to prefer park Downs at the moment! The whole thing accelerated darmatically about some years ago when weedkiller started to be used to ripen crops and clear fields after harvest and before sowing. No more ploughing, seed bank slowly deteriorating. All pretrty desperate stuff.

Dylan Wrathall said...

I have never set foot on Canon's Farm, but know of the venue because of the blogging exploits of Steve and David Campbell. I think that the clue is in the fact that it is a farm - thus not a nature reserve? As much as I agree with your concerns, a commercial farm isn't the place to grow wild flowers!

Steve Gale said...

That last sentence John - it is not meant to convey that I didn't think that 'modern' farming methods had missed Canons Farm rather that Lapwings were not going to be a part of the 'normal' winter scene. If 70+ were hanging around in 2005 (with all of the existing evils being done to inverts and wild flowers) then they were still able to find something to keep them there. It didn't help that the species was getting little help elsewhere.

Phil Slade said...

if "Lapwing is a good bird for here" then I feel your pain. More so when Lapwings bred a hundred yards from my home but no longer do. Their radius of occurrence has expanded to five miles or more and still does. In the meantime we must remain positive and supportive of what the British people have at last chosen as their direction of travel. Maybe if we get it right Lapwings will return in some small numbers to long lost places.

Steve Gale said...

I hope so Phil, as the alternative - a UK even more wildlife impoverished. - doesn't bear thinking about.