Friday, 30 October 2020

A stink in the woods

It's late autumn, it's been raining, therefore logic suggested that there would be a lot of fungi sending fruiting bodies up above ground. My morning visit to the beech woodland close to Mickleham was a partial success - yes, there was fungi, but not in the numbers that I was expecting. Maybe it will be better in the next couple of weeks.

I'm not anything other than a mycological dabbler, so I was quite pleased to identify (within reason) twenty species: Orange Bonnet, Lumpy Bracket, Porcelain Fungus, Southern Bracket, Turkeytail (below), Beech Woodwart, Candlesnuff Fungus, Green Elfcup, Oak Pin, Toothed Crust, Marasmius cohaerrens, Fairy Inkcap, Lemon Disco, Flat Oystering, Burgundydrop Bonnet, Lilac Bonnet, Stinkhorn, Ivory Woodwax, Inky Mushroom and Cabbage Parachute. Haven't they got fantastic names?

The Stinkhorn is always a highlight - foul smelling and covered in flies (but which species?) Today's three individuals all lacked the black goo (spore mass) that normally covers the 'head' - it wears off - but still managed to smell a bit and attract insects. As you can see from the accompanying picture above, disturbing, suggestive and erotic in equal measure...

6 comments:

Gibster said...

Apparently the Victorians would only illustrate Phallus impudicus upside down, for fear of offending the ladyfolk! You do know there's more than one Green Elf Cup, and you need to check the spores to differentiate...

Steve Gale said...

I did know about the Victorian’s sensibilities towards the phallic fungi Seth, and yes, my Elfcup identification is ‘generalist’.... btw, for some reason Blogger will not let me leave a comment on your blog, but if I could I would have told you how much I am enjoying your Scilly posts.

Gibster said...

My silly posts? How very dare you! Oh, I see. No idea why Blogger won't let you leave a comment, I'll have a play and see if I can sort that out at my end. Glad you're enjoying them anyhow :)

Stewart said...

What a great feature of autumn fungi are...now the birding is slowing down, I might venture into some inland habitats for a look around...

Steve Gale said...

There are times Stewart when a great show of fungi is enough - to name them is not necessarily important. Have you read Peter Marren’s ‘Mushrooms’ book? A great read.

Seth, I can leave comments on some, but not others. I think it is the way some blogs are set up, coupled with something at my end no doubt.

Gibster said...

Checked the settings at my end Steve, it says commenting is open to all. I changed it to Blogger members only, then back again just in case that makes any odds.