Late flowerers

For the past 10 days or more I've been banging on to anybody that I meet just how profuse the flowering is, so late in the season. Being November 1st, a beautiful and sunny (even warm) day, and quiet on the bird front, I kept a list of just what was still in flower, and reached a respectable 46 species. They were - for anyone interested - White campion, common gorse, groundsel, viper's-bugloss, common ragwort, yarrow, smooth sow-thistle, pink oxalis, lesser periwinkle, black mustard, wild carrot, bramble agg, red valerian, annual Mercury, moth mullein, Nottingham catchfly, hare's-foot clover, sheep's-bit, sea campion, fennel, common toadflax, common mallow, black horehound, prickly sow-thistle, oxeye daisy, yellow-horned poppy, hieraccium agg, black nightshade, wood sage, common Centaury, common mouse-ear, white clover, ragged robin, wild carrot, perforate st.john's wort, mugwort, mouse-ear hawkweed, English stonecrop, foxglove, broom, ragweed, scarlet pimpernel, greater mullein, daisy, rock samphire and thrift. Maybe the lack of frosts and gales have been kind to them.

Comments

Derek Faulkner said…
Quite an amazing list that, seems that yourself and Plover had the same thought on the same day, which shows how impressive the spectacle must be for the time of year. We badly need some frosts to bring the season round to where it should be, if only to stop my lawn growing!
Steve Gale said…
It isn't just the variety of species still in flower Derek, some of them (particularly Sea Campion) are almost profuse!
Derek Faulkner said…
Well we're into our second day of blanket fog here so can't see any flowers let alone count them. 50 yds vis. on the marsh this morning.
Gibster said…
Ragweed? What the heck is that??? One that I've yet to find so thanks for the head's up!
Steve Gale said…
Seth, look where people feed birds...

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